bitcoin trading system

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To be unsuccessful in retaining possession of; mislay.
  • intransitive verb To be deprived of (something one has had).
  • intransitive verb To be left alone or desolate because of the death of.
  • intransitive verb To be unable to keep alive.
  • intransitive verb To be unable to keep control or allegiance of.
  • intransitive verb To fail to win; fail in.
  • intransitive verb To fail to use or take advantage of.
  • intransitive verb To fail to hear, see, or understand.
  • intransitive verb To let (oneself) become unable to find the way.
  • intransitive verb To remove (oneself), as from everyday reality into a fantasy world.
  • intransitive verb To rid oneself of.
  • intransitive verb To consume aimlessly; waste.
  • intransitive verb To wander from or become ignorant of.
  • intransitive verb To elude or outdistance.
  • intransitive verb To be outdistanced by.
  • intransitive verb To become slow by (a specified amount of time). Used of a timepiece.
  • intransitive verb To cause or result in the loss of.
  • intransitive verb To cause to be destroyed. Usually used in the passive.
  • intransitive verb To cause to be damned.
  • intransitive verb To suffer loss.
  • intransitive verb To be defeated.
  • intransitive verb To operate or run slow. Used of a timepiece.
  • idiom (lose it) To become very angry or emotionally upset.
  • idiom (lose it) To become deranged or mentally disturbed.
  • idiom (lose it) To become less capable or proficient; decline.
  • idiom (lose out on) To miss (an opportunity, for example).
  • idiom (lose time) To operate too slowly. Used of a timepiece.
  • idiom (lose time) To delay advancement.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To praise.
  • A Middle English form of loose.
  • To miss from present possession or knowledge; part with or be parted from by misadventure; fail to keep, as something that one owns, or is in charge of or concerned for, or would keep.
  • To be dispossessed, deprived, or bereaved of; be prevented or debarred from keeping, holding, or retaining; be parted from without wish or consent: as, to lose money by speculation; to lose blood by a wound; to lose one's hair by sickness; to lose a friend by death.
  • To cease to have; part with through change of condition or relations; be rid of or disengaged from.
  • To fail to preserve or maintain: as, to lose one's reputation or reason; to lose credit.
  • To fail to gain or win; fail to grasp or secure; miss; let slip: as, to lose an opportunity; to lose a prize, a game, or a battle.
  • To let slip or escape from observation, perception, etc.: as, I lost what he was saying, from inattention; we lost the ship in the fog.
  • To fail to profit by; miss the use, advantage, or enjoyment of; waste.
  • To cause to miss or be deprived of; subject to the loss of: as, his slowness lost him the chance.
  • To displace, dislodge, or expel.
  • To give over to ruin, disgrace, or shame: chiefly in the past participle.
  • To be bewildered; have the thoughts or reason hopelessly perplexed or confused.
  • To become abstracted or fall into a reverie; become absorbed in thought; lose consciousness, as in slumber.
  • To suffer loss or deprivation.
  • To incur forfeit in a contest; fail to win.
  • To succumb; fail; suffer by comparison.
  • noun The act of losing; loss.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English losen, from Old English losian, to perish, from los, loss; see leu- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English losian

Support

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Examples

  • The one sure way to lose is to pick Hillary for VP.

  • If you play it over and over, without a break between repetitions, you’ll probably find that it becomes weird to you—the same way saying “purple” over and over makes the word lose its meaning.

  • If you play it over and over, without a break between repetitions, you’ll probably find that it becomes weird to you—the same way saying “purple” over and over makes the word lose its meaning.

  • This is what we call a lose / lose situatio♈n, because the cops will either have no sense of humor and arrest you for public intoxication, or they will try to fuck with you and sni𒆙cker amongst themselves while telling you to give it your best shot.

  • All we have to lose is our self-concept of an egalitari🌌an society ...

  • Rae thinking what Jack stands to lose is his team ... in some fashi🤡on ... maybe they will lose him.

  • If he went the way of the Republicans, we would once again lose ജstature in the world and Iran would be able to put the blame on the US for the riots.

  • The only thing you might have to lose is your clothing.

  • The only people who stand to lose from a universal health plan are the bloodsuckers who are making bil𒅌lions by keeping you and the doctor apart.

  • THE BAD NEWS: The one senior that Utah State does lose is a key one -- point guard Jared Quayle, a first-team All-WAC selection who did ♛everything well.

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