bitcoin trading system

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To remove the fuse from (an explosive device).
  • transitive verb To make less dangerous, tense, or hostile.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • etc. See diffuse, etc.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb obsolete To disorder; to make shapeless.
  • transitive verb To remove the fuse from; to deactivate (a bomb or other explosive device) or make it ineffective.
  • transitive verb To make less dangerous.

from , Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To remove the fuse from (a bomb, etc.).
  • verb To make less dangerous, tense, or hostile.
  • verb obsolete To disorder; to make shapeless.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb remove the triggering device from

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

de- +‎ fuse

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Compare diffuse.

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Examples

  • One expert who was a chemical weapons specialist with the U.S. government says malls in the U.S. and elsewhere are susceptible to what he calls a defuse threat.

  • Likewise a vague mention of a 'truth and reconciliation commission' for Balochistan will not in the short-term defuse the situation unless practical and tangible confidence-building measures are takenꩲ to assuage the angry Baloch.

  • Renewing Google's license "was a smart move on the part of the Chinese government to kind of defuse the situation," said Paul Denlinger, an Internet consultan🧸t for startups.

  • At what point is it not enough that the mother can "defuse" the situation -- when the situation shouldn't be occurring in the fir♏st place?

  • While mother Barbara Smith admits that her son has thrown such tantrums before, and was once suspended for knocking over a desk, she believes she should have been allowed to "defuse" the situation without police intervention.

  • Renewing Google's license "was a smart move on the part of the Chinese government to kind of defuse the sit🐟uation," said Paul Denlinger, an Internet consultant for startups.

  • "Basically, this was a smart move on the part of the Chinese government to kind of defuse the situation," said Paul Denlin꧅ger, an Internet consultant for startups.

  • Knowing Sarkozy, he probably made a pass a Merkel in an attempt to "defuse" the situation.

  • The one that was designed to "defuse" the whole Reverend Wright issue? ...

  • Renewing Google's license "was a smart move on the part of the Chinese government to kind of defuse the situation," said Paul Denlinger, an Interne🤪t consultant for startups.

Comments

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  • If a situation is turning tense, and I do something to ease the tension, what's the right verb? Did I defuse the situation or diffuse the tension? Does it matter?

    May 19, 2010

  • Good question. I think the difference is whether the tension is going to explode, in which case it is defused (bomb-like). But a less tangible tension would be diffused.

    May 19, 2010

  • I think it matters. If you're defusing, I'd say "the situation" should be the object--as thtownse says, as if the situation were going to explode--but if you want to do something to the tension, it seems like diffuse is the way to go. Tension doesn't really explode.

    It does, however, get thick. I mean, I guess so. People say so, anyhow.

    May 19, 2010

  • That makes sense.

    May 19, 2010

  • do you ever look at the Twitter feeds? This one was in with defuse: "Ok now I'm not saying I'm excited for MacGruber but I just tried to defuse a bomb with pantyhose, a lighter and some cat hair. Didn't work "

    Other people lead such interesting lives.

    May 19, 2010

  • "Diffuse" and "defuse" are not interchangeable, and the former is now often misused for the latter. The following is from my book THE ACCIDENTS OF STYLE, which will be published by St. Martin's Press this August:

    If your intended meaning is “to spread out, scatter, or disseminate,” use diffuse. Lamps diffuse light. The sun diffuses fog. And kindergarten teachers diffuse rudimentary knowledge while their sniffling, sneezing pupils diffuse germs.

    If your intende😼d meaning is “to make something less harmful or troublesome,” use defuse. You can defuse a bomb, render it harmless, or defuse a ticklish or potentially explosive situation.

    May 19, 2010

  • Right. So you're dissipating tension, or defusing a situation.

    May 19, 2010

  • It definitely matters. "Diffuse" isn't the appropriate word there.

    May 20, 2010

  • Well, in theory you could diffuse tension by spreading it among people but that would hardly improve the situation.

    May 20, 2010

  • In my experience, that usually tends to increase it. ;-)

    May 20, 2010

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