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ruzuzu has adopted no words, looked up 0 words, created 806 lists, listed 38697 words, written 10452 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 2430 words.

Comments by ruzuzu

  • This is great! Is there a name for words such as this—words which are made of other complete words? For instance, I’m thinking carrot is made of car and rot.

    June 4, 2022

  • I'm reminded of one of my favorite jokes: Why do witches wear black? So you can't tell which witch is which.

    May 13, 2022

  • I have to admit that I never knew there was a word for this. That'll learn me. Guess I should find myself a good old-fashioned husking bee.

    April 28, 2022

  • Thanks!

    April 28, 2022

  • I like your lists. Welcome to Wordnik!

    April 28, 2022

  • List me, like you did by the lake on Naboo!

    April 28, 2022

  • Right? I was also thinking democracy, the internet, biofilms... certain kinds of ice or glass.

    April 12, 2022

  • My new favorite list.

    April 12, 2022

  • Often as I’m waking up from a dream, there will be one last word or phrase that lingers. Today it was a riddle: Name something that feels old and structured, but isn’t.

    April 12, 2022

  • I love this list.

    April 6, 2022

  • *stalls*

    April 4, 2022

  • Me? A stalwart? Aw shucks.

    March 30, 2022

  • I've read that POUND, CRANE, and SALET (a variation on sallet) are good to start with, but I like STAMP 💦and STARE.

    March 30, 2022

  • I looked up the postal code--7458 must be near 7457. They're both in Hungary.

    March 22, 2022

  • Oh, yay! Hi possibleunderscore!

    *waves*

    March 17, 2022

  • And hi rolig!

    March 16, 2022

  • I'm still discovering entries that had gotten the wordie treatment--often when I'm looking up something that I thought was new, but that bilby already entered a citation for in 2009.

    Hi bilby from 2009!

    March 16, 2022

  • Likewise, vm.

    March 15, 2022

  • This list is fantastic.

    March 15, 2022

  • "The phenomenon that (Bradley) Voytek and other scientists are investigating in a variety of ways goes by many names. Some call it “the 1/f slope” or “scale-free activity”; Voytek has pushed to rebrand it “the aperiodic signal” or “aperiodic activity.”"

    -- "Brain’s ‘Background Noise’ May Hold Clues to Persistent Mysteries" by Eli𓆏zabeth Landau ()

    March 15, 2022

  • I just looked it up again--it's a prime number (but it seems to be a rather boring one).

    March 15, 2022

  • Miss you, qms.

    March 15, 2022

  • My new favorite list--and currently the only one that lists injective.

    March 15, 2022

  • I like your lists.

    March 11, 2022

  • Those are fantastic, vendingmachine. Thank you!

    March 10, 2022

  • See chrysocolla.

    March 9, 2022

  • Please sir, I want some more entries on my list.

    March 4, 2022

  • See heart urchin, and compare egg-urchin.

    March 3, 2022

  • Thank you. You've just captured all my feelings about The Century Dictionary in general.

    March 3, 2022

  • Would caries count? (I'm thinking dental caries.)

    March 2, 2022

  • That's exciting, tankhughes. Congratulations!

    March 2, 2022

  • Oh, I am so there.

    March 2, 2022

  • My *new* new favorite list.

    March 2, 2022

  • Oh, yes--dancing the St. Giles's hornpipe sounds delightful, too.

    March 1, 2022

  • This is my new favorite list.

    March 1, 2022

  • I can't believe I'm the first person to list this.

    March 1, 2022

  • See bane.

    March 1, 2022

  • "A disease in sheep, more commonly called the rot."

    --Century Dictionary

    March 1, 2022

  • See the comments on vegetarian if you dare.

    March 1, 2022

  • I thought you were a veg*n.

    March 1, 2022

  • See citation on Zealandia.

    February 22, 2022

  • Then in the 1960s, geologists finally agreed on a definition of what a continent is – broadly, a geological area with a high elevation, wide variety of rocks, and a thick crust. It also has to be big. "You just can't be a tiny piece," says |Nick| Mortimer. This gave geologists something to work with – if they could collect the evidence, they could prove that the eighth continent was real.

    Still, the mission stalled – discovering a continent is tricky and expensive, and Mortimer points out that there was no urgency. Then in 1995, the American geophysicist Bruce Luyendyk again described the region as a continent and suggested calling it Zealandia.

    -- "The missing co𝓡ntinent it took 375 ye🗹ars to find" ()

    February 22, 2022

  • One of |Jack| Gallant’s graduate students at the time, Alex Huth, used the Gallant lab’s cutting-edge techniques to analyze where the brain might encode different kinds of visual information. Huth, Gallant and their colleagues had participants watch hours of silent videos while inside fMRI scanners. Then, segmenting the data into records for roughly pea-size volumes of brain tissue called voxels, they analyzed the scans to determine where hundreds of objects and actions were represented across the cortex.

    -- "New Map of Meaning in the Brain Changes Ideas About Memor🌄y" ()

    February 22, 2022

  • I have relatives near Jeff City, I lived down by Springfield for a semester, and I have yet to hear anyone there say "Miz-ur-uh."

    February 16, 2022

  • This is my new favorite list.

    February 15, 2022

  • Thanks, vm, I'm fond of it too. I especially appreciate the sandhills, but there are a lot of scenic spots if you're brave enough to venture off of I-80.

    February 15, 2022

  • Here's a link to more exaggeration postcards from nebraksa: (my favorite is the grasshopper).

    February 15, 2022

  • I knew there had to be a sausage list around here somewhere! I've got an open list, but I'll be yoinking plenty of these.

    February 14, 2022

  • "A karst window, also known as a karst fenster, is a geomorphic feature found in karst landscapes where an underground river is visible from the surface within a sinkhole."

    --

    February 10, 2022

  • Hm. I see that sausage body is al🐽so here. Is there alread༺y a sausage list somewhere?

    February 10, 2022

  • See comment on Georg Christoph Lichtenberg.

    February 9, 2022

  • Georg Christoph Lichtenberg was a well-known German physicist and satirist in the 18-th century. Honoured as an extraordinary professor of physics at the University of Göttingen, he was known to be one of the first scientists to introduce experiments with apparatus in their lectures.

    He also maintained relations with other great German figures of the era such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Immanuel Kant. Legendary mathematician Karl Friedrich Gauss is known to have sat on Lichtenberg’s lectures. He is also well known for his discovery of tree-like electrical discharge patterns which came to be known as Lichtenberg figures.

    -- 𝐆From "🧔How You Really Use Mathematics To Define Paper Size" ()

    February 9, 2022

  • This is my new favorite list.

    February 9, 2022

  • I have some nice vegan fufluns right here--it♛'s a new recipe. Let me know what yo🃏u think.

    February 7, 2022

  • "Whenever the TRAHOR FATIS inscription appears, it is accompanied by a seven–pointed “bearded” star (pogonius), raining influence toward Earth and its denizens."

    -- From "A Renaissance Riddle: ꦿThe Sola Busca Tarot Deck (1491)" ()

    February 3, 2022

  • See ru open list zuzu.

    February 3, 2022

  • Sometimes it's hard to switch back and forth once a list has been started--but the moment I can list things, I will.

    After all, open list is my middle name.

    February 3, 2022

  • Thanks v--I would, but it doesn't seem to be an open list.

    February 2, 2022

  • A variation on the card game hearts:

    Heartsette is another very early variant that is still played. Its distinguishing feature is a widow. When four play, the 2♠ is removed, twelve cards are dealt to each player and the remaining three cards are placed face down in the centre of the table to form the widow. For other numbers of players, the full pack is used, the widow comprising three cards when three play, two when five play and four when six play. The player winning the first trick takes in the widow and any hearts it contains. That player may look at these cards but may not show them to anyone. Otherwise, the game is played as normal. The key difference from basic Hearts is that the first winner is the only one who knows how many and which hearts are still to be played.

    From (card_game)&oldid=1069036466

    February 2, 2022

  • I think there are various Albions, too--one in Nebraska, one in Iowa.

    February 1, 2022

  • Nebraska can offer Geneva, Peru, Cairo, Syracuse, York, Prague, and Gothenburg, among others--but there used to be more: Lancaster was renamed Lincoln in 1869, and Berlin changed to Otoe in 1918.

    February 1, 2022

  • Also see terrella.

    January 28, 2022

  • See comment on able.

    January 28, 2022

  • From the Online Etymology Dictionary:

    Able seaman, one able to do any sort of work required on a ship, may be the origin of this:

    "Able-whackets - A popular sea-game with cards, in which the loser is beaten over the palms of the hands with a handkerchief tightly twisted like a rope. Very popular with horny-fisted sailors. |Smyth, "Sailor's Word-Book," 1867|"

    (See )

    January 28, 2022

  • Thanks, vm! Wahoo!

    January 20, 2022

  • Oh, fun! Will you accept two-word phrases? (I'm thinking bull-beef and bull thistles, &c.)

    January 20, 2022

  • Thank you, yarb. I'm surprised mollusque hasn't listed more of these.

    January 19, 2022

  • "The researchers, based in Singapore, Denmark and Poland, chose a tardigrade to try to entangle because of its ability to enter long hibernation to withstand things like searing heat, freezing cold, extraordinarily high pressures, and high levels of ionizing radiation. This hibernation is called cryptobiosis; the animal desiccates, shedding the moisture from its body, and only reanimates when conditions become more manageable."

    -- "Sc𒁃ientists Tried to Quantum Entangle a Tardigrade" by Isaac Schultz ()

    January 19, 2022

  • I can't believe I'm the first person to list this.

    January 18, 2022

  • "Typically, Socrates' opponent would make what would seem to be an innocuous assertion. In response, Socrates, via a step-by-step train of reasoning, bringing in other background assumptions, would make the person admit that the assertion resulted in an absurd or contradictory conclusion, forcing him to abandon his assertion and adopt a position of aporia."

    --

    December 28, 2021

  • Also see sop.

    December 27, 2021

  • What a fun list!

    December 21, 2021

  • "A version of a folk tale about a girl made of snow and named Snegurka (Snezhevinochka; Снегурка (Снежевиночка)) was published in 1869 by Alexander Afanasyev in the second volume of his work The Poetic Outlook on Nature by the Slavs, where he also mentions the German analog, Schneekind ("Snow Child")."

    --

    December 16, 2021

  • Snegurka.

    December 16, 2021

  • See the definition on cib.

    December 13, 2021

  • *trips silent alarm*

    December 2, 2021

  • (No mention of using soup as a dye for leather, though.)

    December 2, 2021

  • Oh, ew. The Century has given us this gem: "In leather-coloring, to apply a coating of blood to, in order to obtain a good black."

    December 2, 2021

  • Now I'm wondering about the etymology of blood.

    December 2, 2021

  • For what it's worth, I'm looking at the online version of the OED (through my library's subscription), and I see the following:

    "a1340 R. Rolle Psalter xvii. 11 He maked his son to take fleisse and blode.

    1393 W. Langland Piers Plowman C. ii. 153 Whanne hit hadde of þe folde flesch and blod ytake.

    1509 Parlyament Deuylles (de Worde) lxxii I..toke flesshe and blode a mayde within.1598 W. Shakespeare Love's Labour's Lost i. i. 186 I would see his owne person in flesh and blood."

    December 2, 2021

  • Not what I was expecting.

    November 19, 2021

  • Welcome! Nice to see a fellow fan of The Century.

    I just saw your question over on the page for the word synchronously. Generally, the best way to show a word is one of your fꦑavorites is to log in and select "love" at the top of the page for th🌱at word. Hope that helps!

    November 19, 2021

  • It did occur to me to wonder whether trink and drink were related.

    There's an old klezmer song called "Skrip, klezmerl, skripe" where an uncle sings "kh’vel trinken vi a fish/ un vel tantsn bay der khupe," which is translated as "Now I will drink like a fish/ and dance by the wedding canopy," (See here: ).

    But, also, do folks still get thrown "into the drink"? And could we then use a trink to rescue them?

    November 19, 2021

  • Compare trench and tranche.

    November 18, 2021

  • Compare cow pie.

    November 1, 2021

  • Cf. cow pat.

    November 1, 2021

  • See comments on ahuruhuru.

    October 26, 2021

  • Umbrage! Everyone knows it's wasteful to use only half a ruzuzu. What'll you do, stick the ruz in the fridge with some lemon juice? Throw the uzu away? Feh.

    October 26, 2021

  • Oh, hey, ruzuzu from 2018--thank you. I was stuck on this again.

    This time I'll add that C.S. Peirce also wrote about abduction, but it's the kind of rabbit hole that leads one to muttering about confectio Damocritis.

    October 19, 2021

  • "The term “abduction” was coined by Charles Sanders Peirce in his work on the logic of science. He introduced it to denote a type of non-deductive inference that was different from the already familiar inductive type."

    -- From the "Peirce on Abduction" section of the online Stanford Encyclopedia of Phil𓄧oso꧑phy ()

    October 19, 2021

  • This is my new favorite list.

    October 13, 2021

  • I think it's where they play jai alai.

    October 13, 2021

  • Adding this to the list of qms poems.

    October 11, 2021

  • Smiting seems more like an -ectomy.

    September 28, 2021

  • Not sure why bilby is anti-anthesis.

    September 25, 2021

  • Aha! Here it is.

    September 21, 2021

  • Do we have any penny lists?

    September 20, 2021

  • "The Flower of Kent is a green cultivar of cooking apple. According to the story, this is the apple Isaac Newton saw falling to ground from its tree, inspiring his laws of universal gravitation. It is pear-shaped, mealy, and sub-acid, and of generally poor quality by today's standards. As its name suggests, this cultivar likely originated from Kent, England."

    --

    September 13, 2021

  • See biquinary.

    September 6, 2021

  • I hadn't--but I sure will now!

    September 6, 2021

  • See wherry.

    August 27, 2021

  • Not what I was expecting.

    August 27, 2021

  • See odd-come-shortly.

    August 25, 2021

  • Also see herb-robert.

    August 25, 2021

  • I like your lists.

    August 25, 2021

  • Oh. Here's one. (See comment on passing-bell.)

    August 25, 2021

  • Do we have any bell lists yet?

    August 25, 2021

  • Big hugs from me, too. So very sorry for your loss.

    August 24, 2021

  • See takotsubo.

    August 24, 2021

  • "The name "takotsubo" comes from the Japanese word takotsubo "octopus trap", because the left ventricle of the heart takes on a shape resembling an octopus trap when affected by this condition."

    -- From Wikipedia's takotsubo cardiomyopathy page ()

    August 24, 2021

  • Ooh. Do we need a new list? I know there are some parasite lists here, but do we need something a bit more specific?

    August 22, 2021

  • Maybe just one more.

    *press*

    August 21, 2021

  • Mphfh.

    *coughs*

    It’s okay.

    *press*

    August 21, 2021

  • *press*

    August 21, 2021

  • Can I get a ruling on whether tapeworms belong on this list or the other list? See here:

    August 20, 2021

  • *press*

    August 19, 2021

  • I love it when my fufluns have grape riffles.

    August 19, 2021

  • Why I oughta...

    August 18, 2021

  • My new favorite list.

    August 18, 2021

  • *trips silent alarm*

    August 17, 2021

  • I b'eave you're correct.

    August 11, 2021

  • How much land would a land-beaver beaver if a land-beaver could beaver land?

    August 10, 2021

  • Thank you, ry--I had the same question.

    August 10, 2021

  • Sine qua non.

    July 26, 2021

  • In September 2014, |Peter| Scholze was teaching a special course at the University of California, Berkeley. Despite being only 26, he was already a legend in the mathematics world. Two years earlier he had completed his dissertation, in which he articulated a new geometric theory based on objects he’d invented called perfectoid spaces. He then used this framework to solve part of a problem in number theory called the weight-monodromy conjecture.

    — “New Shape Opens ‘🍌Wormhole’ Between Numbers and Geometry” B🐲y Kevin Hartnett, July 19, 2021 ()

    July 24, 2021

  • I found tobias fish or "sand eel," which would appear to be another fish that just looks like an eel.

    Guess it's time to make another list. (h🎀ttp://sanmaklight.c🍃om/lists/eel-shaped-fish-gvtNIN5hT06l)

    July 19, 2021

  • See the etymology for lanterloo ("Frencꦗh lanturlu, originally the refrain of a sixteenth-century s✱ong.")

    July 19, 2021

  • Not likely to fall down.

    July 18, 2021

  • This is my new favorite list.

    July 18, 2021

  • You're right, ry. I couldn't help myself.

    And bilby, I'm surprised you haven't added corkscrew or plastic toothpick.

    July 18, 2021

  • For a list, see this list made by oroboros: http://sanmaklight.com/lists/autantonyms.

    May 31, 2021

  • Furthermore, Italian aristocratic titles first originated as military titles: the Latin imperator, “general,” became “emperor”; centurions were called princeps, “first citizen,” eventually “prince”; dux, “leader,” led to “duke”; comes, “companion,” to “count”; late Latin baro, “soldier,” evolved into “baron.”

    — “Light in the Pa🥀lazzo” by Ingrid D. Rowland, New York Review of Books.

    May 16, 2021

  • Compare with smoor.

    May 2, 2021

  • This makes me hungry for s’mores.

    May 2, 2021

  • I once got in trouble for using a phrase I’d heard Flo the waitress say on an old episode of “Alice.” I had turned to a classmate on the playground and said, “Kiss my grits,” but I don’t think any of us—students or staff—ac♕tually knew what grits were, so it was hard to defend myself.

    May 2, 2021

  • Hi rculver00! I just add🔴ed a comment on 💯your profile about making lists.

    May 2, 2021

  • Welcome to Wordnik! Just saw your comment on elide. If you press the button that says “love” on the page for a word, that word will automatically show up here under your “Favorites” on your profile. If you decide to make a new list and add a word, everyone can see the list and what you’ve added—but you can ༒set the list up initially so that nobody else can add words to your list. (Open lists are amusing though.) Have fun!

    May 2, 2021

  • There was just a story about this madeupical word on CBS Sunday Morning:

    May 2, 2021

  • “On November 1, 2016, NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over Indonesia, allowing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board to capture a stunning true-color image of oceanic nonlinear internal solitary waves from the Lombok Strait.”

    May 1, 2021

  • Thank you, fbharjo. I love it.

    April 7, 2021

  • “Warp speed” may be a term of the moment, thanks to the federal coronavirus vaccine program. But it’s also one with a history — which goes back farther than “Star Trek,” to a forgotten 1952 science fiction story in the pulp magazine Imagination.

    Ditto for “transporter,” “moon base” and “deep space,” to name just a few of the more than 400 words whose origins are getting pushed back🎃 earlier than their previously first appearance, thaไnks to the Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction, a new free online resource released on Tuesday.”

    Here’s a link to that dictionaryꦗ of “more than 40ജ0 words”:

    January 27, 2021

  • See mum for clarification.

    January 15, 2021

  • RU zuzu? Yes I am.

    January 7, 2021

  • Why, yes—I am indeed.

    December 28, 2020

  • See use in citations on tokamak.

    December 28, 2020

  • “Harnessing this form of nuclear power, though, has proven extremely difficult, requiring heating a soup of subatomic particles, called plasma, to hundreds of millions of degrees – far too hot for any material container to withstand. To work around this, scientists developed a donut-shaped chamber with a strong magnetic field running through it, called a tokamak, which suspends the plasma in place.“

    — “Is nuclear fusion the answer to the climate crisis? Promising new studies suggest the long elusive technology may be capable of producing e🀅lectricity for the grid by the end of the decade.” By Oscar Schwartz, Mon 28 Dec 2020 05.00 EST ()

    December 28, 2020

  • Have you ever seen the Muffin Fan and the Fuflun Man in the same room at the same time?

    November 24, 2020

  • Not what I was expecting.

    November 24, 2020

  • Do you know the Muffin Fan?

    November 23, 2020

  • “Though all boids are constrictors, only this species is properly referred to as a "boa constrictor" – a rare instance of an animal having the same common English name and scientific binomial name. (Another such animal is the extinct theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex.)”

    November 23, 2020

  • Venus Hum used to open for the Blue Man Group.

    November 3, 2020

  • Last I heard, they were opening for Styx on the state fair circuit—but I’m not sure whether the virus has changed their tour plans.

    November 2, 2020

  • Mostly I remember being angry at those bouncers—especially the tall one with the bulging thews—but they were probably right about not shooting off fireworks in that enclosed space.

    November 1, 2020

  • “Born in Barcelona in 1916, Cirlot was a composer, a musicologist, an art critic, a translator, and a collector of antique swords. In the 1940s he became well-acquainted with, and translated the poetry of, avant-garde writers such as Paul Éluard, André Breton, and Antonin Artaud.”

    From “A Dictio🥂nary Takes Us Through the Fascinating History of Symbols: Juan Eduardo Cirlot’s A Dictionary of Symbols has been an invaluable resource for decoding symbols since it was first published in 1958.” By Angelica Frey, Hyperallergic, October 31, 2020 ( )

    November 1, 2020

  • Even better if the books being cooked are cook books.

    October 15, 2020

  • "A Bradel binding (also called a bonnet or bristol board binding) is a style of book binding with a hollow back. It most resembles a case binding in that it has a hollow back and visible joint, but unlike a case binding, it is built up on the book."

    --

    September 10, 2020

  • I like your lists.

    September 10, 2020

  • Is there already a panda list somewhere? I was going to make a pun about pandan.

    August 14, 2020

  • “The word cultigen was coined in 1918 by Liberty Hyde Bailey (1858–1954) an American horticulturist, botanist and cofounder of the American Society for Horticultural Science. He was aware of the need for special categories for those cultivated plants that had arisen by intentional human activity and which would not fit neatly into the Linnaean hierarchical classification of ranks used by the International Rules of Botanical Nomenclature (which later became the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants).”

    Miss you, qms.

    August 14, 2020

  • "An important phenomenon responsible for dissipating energy in a channel is the hydraulic jump. A hydraulic jump occurs in a channel when shallow, high velocity (supercritical) water meets slower moving (subcritical) water. The short and turbulent transition between the two water depths is called a hydraulic jump."

    --

    August 6, 2020

  • Rodents of unusual size? I don’t believe they exist.

    June 27, 2020

  • “Lothar Collatz, like most German students of his time, studied at a number of different universities. He entered the University of Greifswald in 1928, moving to Munich, then to Göttingen, and finally to Berlin where he studi🍎ed for his doctorate under Alfred Klose.” —

    June 27, 2020

  • Cf. schadenscrolling.

    June 22, 2020

  • “Each day brings further entries into the popular lexicon: ventilator, community spread, doomscrolling. (The latter is slang for an excessive amount of screen time devoted to the absorption of dystopian news.)”

    — “‘Quarantini.’ ‘Doomscrolling.’ Here’s how the coronavirus is changing th🌠e way we talk” by Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times, April 11, 2020.

    June 22, 2020

  • “I wouldn't call schadenscrolling a *good* use of a Saturday night, but it beats the hell out of doomscrolling.”

    — David Roberts (@drvox) via Twitter

    June 22, 2020

  • pseudotirolitid

    April 27, 2020

  • Welcome! Would you like to try some fufluns with grape riffles? I'm also experimenting with jimmies.

    April 27, 2020

  • “The Antonine Plague of 165 to 180 AD, also known as the Plague of Galen (after Galen, a Greek physician who lived in the Roman Empire and described it), was an ancient pandemic brought to the Roman Empire by troops who were returning from campaigns in the Near East.”

    April 11, 2020

  • Oh. Here:

    In these many reviews, the preciousness and sensuousness of both the building and the Collection are frequently referenced, often by referring to the building as a “jewel box.” Ada Louise Huxtable, the venerable architectural critic of the New York Times, was perhaps the first to do this. She introduced the building by stating: “Small. Elegant. Its contemporary style has been planned to complement, rather than copy, the Georgian-style mansion to which it is connected by a simple corridor. The effect is of ancient treasures in a modern jewel box.”

    -- From "Critical Appraisal of t⭕he Philip Johnson Pavilion" by James N. Carder ( (footnote remo🦹ved))

    April 3, 2020

  • Nice, ry.

    For ⛄some reason, I associate it most with Philip Johnson.

    April 3, 2020

  • I see your umbrage and raise you some unjustified indignation.

    March 23, 2020

  • (See, e.g., marathon of phony umbrage taking.)

    March 18, 2020

  • Also see take umbrage, if you dare.

    March 18, 2020

  • Umbrage! I can't believe this hasn't been listed more often on this site.

    March 18, 2020

  • Do you have Prince Albert in a can?

    March 17, 2020

  • Oh! Are the vending machines running?

    *waits two seconds, then shouts*

    Then we'd better go catch them!!!

    *wanders off to the Prince Albert page*

    March 17, 2020

  • From Wikipedia's page about Walter Kerr: "Notoriously he is credited with one of the world's shortest reviews, "Me no Leica" for John Van Druten's I Am a Camera in the New York Herald Tribune, December 31, 1951." ()

    March 10, 2020

  • Wow--this is my new favorite list.

    March 6, 2020

  • Compare terminal burrowing.

    March 6, 2020

  • Compare paradoxical undressing.

    March 6, 2020

  • What time is it when the elephants sit on your northern fence?

    March 6, 2020

  • Just got this as a random word. How has this not been listed yet?

    February 27, 2020

  • Maybe nebraksa is the vegan alternative to Nebraska.

    February 26, 2020

  • Yeah, the most amusing thing to hear in a restaurant around here is "Oh, you're a vegetarian. You eat chicken, though, right?"

    February 26, 2020

  • Also? Still a better slogan than "Meth. We're on it."

    February 24, 2020

  • Ashland is great. I took a class there about sewing signatures for bookbinding.

    It ❀also happens to be where some of the folks returning from China get to hang out in quarantine whilst 💞they wait to see whether they have the dreaded corona virus.

    February 24, 2020

  • Ha!

    February 19, 2020

  • I like your lists!

    February 19, 2020

  • Ooh. Them's fightin' words.

    February 13, 2020

  • *trips over inert llamas*

    February 13, 2020

  • See citation on quaternion.

    January 24, 2020

  • The great breakthrough in quaternions finally came on Monday 16 October 1843 in Dublin, when Hamilton was on his way to the Royal Irish Academy where he was going to preside at a council meeting. As he walked along the towpath of the Royal Canal with his wife, the concepts behind quaternions were taking shape in his mind. When the answer dawned on him, Hamilton could not resist the urge to carve the formula for the quaternions . . . into the stone of Brougham Bridge as he paused on it. Although the carving has since faded away, there has been an annual pilgrimage since 1989 called the Hamilton Walk for scientists and mathematicians who walk from Dunsink Observatory to the Royal Canal bridge in remembrance of Hamilton's discovery.

    -- from

    January 24, 2020

  • Ha!

    January 16, 2020

  • Uh... so has anyone created a ferret list yet?

    January 15, 2020

  • Would you consider adding ferret?

    January 15, 2020

  • I love that one definition has "abounding" and the other has "a bounding."

    January 15, 2020

  • Brackets around moozuzu, please. I'm sure there's a list where you can stick it.

    January 15, 2020

  • Funny that this is about moles instead of cows.

    January 13, 2020

  • What a great list! My favorite is the Diet of Worms, but it seeౠms as if you're going for something els🎶e here.

    January 13, 2020

  • Ooh! That's fun.

    January 10, 2020

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Comments for ruzuzu

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  • I just noticed for the first time your kind comment on my profile!! Thank you!! I like your lists! They've se⛎rved as many 💞an inspiration for me.

    March 29, 2018

  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • Hey zuzu, hummus detected at botryoidal!

    May 17, 2016

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzu🍎zuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • This made me think of you: It was probabl🐓y the bananaphone.

    June 18, 2015

  • I only just recently noticed that there's a comments section! Yikes! Anyways, unreal-laurens-friend-finder is up and running and needs contrib🦋ut💦ions! So many exclamation points!

    June 16, 2015

  • Eek! TankHughes, I'm glad I was able to point out that list to you, but I'm sorry 💎to contribute to the demise of another. May I console myself with the thought that you'll eventually replace it with a new list for our amusement?

    April 23, 2015

  • I'd respond to you on my list... BUT I DELETED IT! *shock* It made more sense to add my 4 to tbtabby's Location Slang list instead. I'm happy someone else has made a large list that I can legitimately add Canadian tuxedo and Mexican wave to.

    April 21, 2015

  • Thank you for your kind comment of December 15, ruzuzu. It pains me to have overlooked your comment for so long but, in the absence of the Community page, I seem to have been looking in the wrong places for evidence of activity. I had begun to fear that I was the only one still visiting regularly.

    When I last communicated with Erin she wrote that she had a fix for the Community page but was having difficulty getting it installed on the server. I think it is possible we will not have the Community page back until after the holidays. I hope people will not have lost the habit of visiting.

    I hope your holidays are happy ones.

    December 22, 2014

  • Nope. Just dry pita pocket editions.

    August 11, 2014

  • Hey babe, read any good hummus books lately?

    August 10, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby. I needed that.

    July 21, 2014

  • Can you ask around for me then? I'm sure they come from Riga.

    *chortle chortle chortle*

    July 18, 2014

  • I'm really only a half-Lat. I have no idea what a marole is.

    July 18, 2014

  • What is a marole? I thought I might as well ask a Latvian.

    July 18, 2014

  • I don't know of a list for obsolete and disused science terms. Maybe time to start one?

    May 11, 2014

  • I vote we name the inherent sound of fun ruzuzurrus

    March 19, 2014

  • And 𝕴so do I!But I do🎐n't understand how we are supposed to find this █████ comment box on one's profile.

    February 21, 2014

  • Hi ruzuzu. Bovine traces detected over at jomo.

    December 13, 2013

  • Hey ruzuzu, I have tripled the length of your calculator words list - hope you like it!

    May 13, 2013

  • I haven't heard her perform. I did have a chance to listen to her read some of her poems. She did them more than justice!

    April 16, 2013

  • I knew she plays the sax. Have you read 'Crazy Brave' yet? I wonder how many people realize the etymological significance of the title.Playing the sax is 'crazy brave' of course.

    The sax is the ultimate soul instrument with its long neck and throaty sound (see nephesh)

    My niece 🅷Ramona has taught me that well!She has 'crazy brave' in her blo🤪od, too.

    April 16, 2013

  • Me? Why?

    *retaliates with a volley of fufluns*

    January 28, 2013

  • Fonk you, ruzuzu.

    January 28, 2013

  • gallbladder!

    December 13, 2012

  • Spent the past half-hour reading your lists and almost choking on them. Love you!

    December 5, 2012

  • Thanks for sharper ruzuzu!

    November 8, 2012

  • um............................... hi

    October 4, 2012

  • "ruzuzu has looked up 87912 wordꦓs"OMG get a life u loser. seriously who looks up words and then comonts on them like...pfft

    July 24, 2012

  • *yawn*

    July 22, 2012

  • Ruzuzu you smell and your stupid and i think ur dumb 2 44s i mene wtf u evn @m a& u no wht i mee????????.....

    July 22, 2012

  • Thanks for the red admiral! By the way, I borrowed some of your spiders for my own little collection.

    July 10, 2012

  • Hi ruzuzu.

    It took me a while to find this reply box.Thank you for the welcome message.Please feel free to comment on my lists or add words to them.

    Robert

    May 22, 2012

  • Hello,

    Am a young single girl never married seeking true love for a long term relationship with marriage potentials,i am happy to contact you because you cut my interest! i will love us to be good friends or a lot more, you can contact me through.([email protected])so that i will send you my photos,till i hear from you, bye and kisses!

    Miss Aisha

    May 16, 2012

  • Huh! Can't even make the pronunciations play at "hot dog"....go figure. ACK!

    April 25, 2012

  • So, the feedback page is otiose? 'Zu, are you able to create pronunciations? I'm having no luck at all. Is it broke? Can we access pronunciations of old?

    April 25, 2012

  • And I less than three you! Miss you guys. You know how it feels sometimes, though... I visit often but can't find anything to add to the conversation.

    I really wish there was an easier way to follow threads. If you don't spend lots of time here, you have to open all links on the Zeitmunity page. There has to be a different way!

    March 29, 2012

  • Thanks, 'zu. I probably would have found it eventually if I'd spent more time. Cheers!

    March 16, 2012

  • oh thank you, good catch!

    February 1, 2012

  • Thanks! Start -geddon ready to add some words...

    http://sanmaklight.com/lists/geddon--1

    January 29, 2012

  • Glad you liked my definition of Bulgar - I'm a total newbie. Don't know how to create a list, or what its purpose is, or how to use it, etc. Tips?

    January 20, 2012

  • hututu....??

    January 15, 2012

  • What's all the fuss about <3' secret messages? Ah! I see! Can it really be as simple as hiding messages behind' hearts?

    January 14, 2012

  • Perhaps I'm <3' not' as smart as I think I am.

    January 13, 2012

  • Hmm.

    January 13, 2012

  • Dear ruzuzu,

    You are <3' the opposite of' a terrible bore.

    Yours with no <3' thing but' fondness,

    Yarb.

    January 13, 2012

  • Thanks, Pro!

    January 13, 2012

  • <3'<3'<3'

    January 13, 2012

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